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DNA For Personal And Organizational Nonprofit Wellbeing – Kathleen Robinson

DNA For Personal And Organizational Nonprofit Wellbeing - Kathleen Robinson

DNA For Personal And Organizational Nonprofit Wellbeing – Kathleen Robinson is Dr. Robinson’s take on what the charitable sector has faced and will face for years to come. The DNA For Personal And Organizational Nonprofit Wellbeing is a three-part video series and can be located in NANOE’s Impact Video Library.Here’s what she has to share about this important new resource:

2020 and 2021 have taught many nonprofit leaders that the time to build capacity to weather major financial and organizational crises is before they occur!  It has taught many of us that we want to build greater capacity to handle more effectively personal, relational, financial and community crises.  Having both the personal and organizational capacities to weather the good and bad times are essential to our personal and organizational wellbeing and a more meaningful life.

The DNA For Personal And Organizational Nonprofit Wellbeing is a three-part video series that explores the fundamentals of creating, maintaining, re-defining, and re-developing your personal sense of purpose, passion, your ability to be resilient, persevere, and truly commit to doing what you desire to do.

DNA For Personal And Organizational Nonprofit Wellbeing – Kathleen Robinson

We all know in both our personal lives as well as our work life that what we will to do, we do not always do.  Things about our personal and organizational life that we know we need to work on often get shoved aside with the tyranny of the seemingly urgent!  However, how we handle personally and organizationally the urgent, the crisis, and the good times are reliant on the clarity of our individual and corporate life purposes and passions, our current capability to be resilient in an ever-changing environment, to persevere when the going gets rough as well as being steadfast in our resolve during the good times when it is easy to put off what we know we need to do to improve our health and wellbeing.  Whether it be losing weight or building a robust fundraising or evaluation capacity in our organization, the same DNA elements are involved.  And we may want to make necessary, positive personal and organizational changes but do not exercise the will power needed to really make the change, to be steadfast in our commitment!  We simply do not do what we know we need to!  You may say ‘that’s life!”  BUT it does not need to be that way and is not what will produce a meaningful life personally or at work.

The DNA For Personal And Organizational Nonprofit Wellbeing explores how to develop, clarify, maintain, and re-define your personal and your organization’s DNA for wellbeing.  The videos take us back to the basics, the foundational understandings of how to live a purpose-driven life at home and at work.  It provides basic things that you can do personally and that your organization can do corporately to bring positive change, joy, satisfaction, wellbeing, and greater meaning to your personal and organizational life.

The most effective nonprofit leaders have mastered these fundamentals.  As a result, their workplaces are playgrounds of innovation rather than battlegrounds of survival.  People show up with their heart, head, and hands!  Staff and volunteers associated with nonprofits with a robust DNA flourish, are more productive, stay longer, and accomplish positive results at a greater scale and impact.

With this unusual time in our nation’s history, we have new opportunities to examine our personal and organizational capacity to not only survive but to thrive.  Now is the time to work on your personal and organizational DNA in order to come through 2020-2021 with new capacities, a renewed sense of direction, a renewed sense of commitment to do what we individually and corporately are called to do personally and professionally.

The DNA For Personal And Organizational Nonprofit Wellbeing is a three-part video series and can be located in NANOE’s Impact Video Library.

Part 1: Purpose

Part 2: Passion

Part 3 Resilience, Perseverance, Will Power

The discussion on each of the five DNA elements is approximately 30 minutes long.  We hope you will view them to work on your personal life, as well as use them during staff and leadership meetings to discuss where staff and the organization stands on each element.

We encourage each of you to personally and corporately re-examine and renew your individual and corporate understanding of that which you love, value and believe, that which the world needs, that which you can get paid for, and that which you are good at!  In essence become purpose-driven in life and at work.  Transform your nonprofit into a purpose-driven body of staff and volunteers that thrives during both the good and bad times in life.

DNA For Personal And Organizational Nonprofit Wellbeing – Kathleen Robinson was first posted at NANOE News

The post DNA For Personal And Organizational Nonprofit Wellbeing – Kathleen Robinson appeared first on NANOE | Charity’s Official Website.

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Kathleen Robinson
Kathleen Robinson
During her fifty-year career, Dr. Robinson worked in community and regional support systems development for at-risk families, children and youth organizations, community-based literacy systems, holistic family centers and nonprofit human services organizations. In addition, her focus has been on systems-based approaches to community planning and policy development, and social impact assessments of various community change projects. Her expertise is rural, integrated community development. Dr. Robinson previously served as Director of the Center on Neighborhood Development and the Director of the Center on Nonprofit Leadership within the Institute on Families and Neighborhood Life at Clemson University (1998-2009). She also co-lead in the development of the Institute’s PHD program in International Family and Community Studies. Prior to her work at Clemson University, she was Associate Director and Research Professor at the Institute for Families in Society and Director of the Division on Neighborhood Development at the University of South Carolina (1995-1998). From 1981-1995, she was a tenured Assistant and Associate Professor in the College of Agriculture and Human Resources (Department of Human Resources), an Associate Professor in the College of Social Sciences (Department of Urban and Regional Planning), and Research Associate in the Center on Youth Development at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. In 1977, she and her husband moved to Hawaii where she was a Research Associate in the Culture Learning Institute at the East-West Center (1978-1981) before joining the UHM faculty. From 1975-1978, she was a senior graduate assistant and Research Associate in the Nonformal Education Institute at Michigan State University working on a multi-million dollar USAID project in Indonesia to enhance the nation’s teacher training college system to include, among other things, an emphasis on community development initiatives. In addition, she served as Vice President of Program and Publications for Pioneer Girls, a faith-based, interdenominational, international girls club, camp and women’s leadership development program (1970-1975). From 1967-1970, she was a graduate assistant in the College of Education at Texas Women’s University working on marine biology science curriculums for inland schools, and a science teacher in the Denton Texas public school system. While studying at Moody Bible Institute, she founded and directed an out of school child and teen development and literacy center in two housing projects in Chicago, as well as founding and hosting a radio program at WMBI (1964-1970). Dr. Robinson testified several times before the U.S. Congress, several states’ legislative bodies, and the United Nations. She served as a consultant to numerous state social service, health, juvenile justice, governors’ offices, environmental, and municipal agencies. Internationally she was a consultant to 28 international organizations, including several divisions of the United Nations, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, ASEAN and the All Union (USSR) Academy of Sciences, Asian Development Bank, Asian Institute for Technology, Australian Commonwealth’s Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Canadian International Development Agency, Chulalongkorn University Social Research Institute, European Centre For Social Welfare Policy and Research, the German Development Bank, German Ministry of Education, Indonesian Ministry of Education and Culture, and the U.S. Peace Corps. She has received numerous awards and recognitions from her work, including several fellowships and an Award of Distinction from the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges for her leadership of a national task group to add new science understanding to what was offered through schools and colleges of Agriculture and Natural Resources across the U.S. She was awarded the University of Hawaii Regents’ Medal for Excellence in Teaching in 1990, the highest award given at UHM. She also has received awards of distinction from the U.S. Peace Corps and USDA for her community development work. At the University of South Carolina, she was recognized for her contributions to research productivity, and received three faculty excellence awards while at Clemson University. Texas Woman’s University honored her in 2015 with the Chancellor’s Alumni Excellence Award and, that same year, the National Development Institute awarded her their 25th anniversary Nonprofit Leadership Award. In 2017, the National Association of Nonprofit Executives and Organizations honored her with their first Robinson Lifetime Achievement Award. She received letters of commendation from three states’ governors for her work in enhancing various aspects of human service delivery systems. Having traveled and worked in 151 countries, she is a recognized leader in rural community development in a variety of national and cultural contexts. She retired in 2009 from Clemson University but remains affiliated with the Institute as an Adjunct Professor. Since her retirement, she has remained active in leadership roles within two charter schools, National Development Institute and the National Association of Nonprofit Organizations & Executives. She currently lives in Pawleys Island, South Carolina.

1 Comment

  1. Dr. Robinson is correct in that non-profits need to be ready in advance of a financial crisis in order to weather that crisis. That’s also true for opportunities. American civil rights leader Whitney Young said, “It’s better to be prepared for an opportunity and not have one than have an opportunity and not be prepared.” Whether it’s a great opportunity or a overwhelming problem, building capacity is essential for the ups and downs of non-profit growth.

    Stephen Forbus
    National Non-Profit Resource Center
    http://www.NNPRC.org

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